Day One in Dubai

Note: As described in this post, I’m in Dubai as a member of the Global Agenda Council on Social Media for the World Economic Forum. I’ll be sharing some of experiences here on SMUG.

I arrived in Dubai about 7:30 p.m. Saturday night, feeling reasonably well-rested after the 14-hour flight from Seattle by way of the North Pole. The service on Emirates Air Boeing 777 was outstanding, as was the seating (or bedding) in Business Class.

Flying over North Pole

 

Flat bed Emirates

 

So the result was that I was energized for a big day yesterday. The coordinator for our Global Agenda Council on Social Media advised us that we should be sure to bring sunglasses and sunscreen, which led me into a few adventures on the way to the convention centre, inspiring this tweet:

For those who may not recall the cultural significance, see this clip for the background:

After a lunch during which our council got to meet face-to-face for the first time, and then an opening plenary session with all of the other councils, we settled in for an afternoon of brainstorming on what high impact projects we should consider for our two-year term.

This morning we have some cross-council meetings, and I get to participate in a breakfast discussing the global response to Ebola.

You can follow, and join in the discussion, on Twitter via the #WEFSocMed hashtag.

 

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Off to Dubai!

WEF Global Agenda Screen ShotI’m writing this from the International Lounge at the airport in Seattle, as I am waiting for the boarding call for my flight to Dubai, in the United Arab Emirates.

In September, I was invited and accepted an appointment to a two-year term on the Global Agenda Council on Social Media, which is sponsored by the World Economic Forum.

Most of our meetings are by videoconference, but we meet face-to-face once per year in Dubai. The first of these meetings starts Sunday afternoon.

I have a lot of reading to do to prepare, and thankfully have a 14-hour flight on Emirates Air in which to do it. We’ll be using the #WEFSocMed tag for our part of the Summit. As I get more info about other hashtags I’ll be updating. I think I’ll use #LeeInDubai for some personal tweets.

 

 

 

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Making the Case in Oregon

This morning I’m honored to be speaking and conducting a workshop at the 2014 Fall Conference of the Healthcare Communicators of Oregon (#HCOFall2014). I appreciate the flexibility Tom Eiland and the conference planning committee showed in allowing me to be a morning speaker instead of the previously planned closing keynote.

My second and third slides give the reason for the switch:

After my presentation on “The Case for Social Media in Health Care” I also will be leading a brief workshop on “Best Practices and Tips for Success,” the slides for which are below:

I look forward to a good discussion this morning, and to the adventure in Dubai. More on that in a post later today.

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Google Ad Sales Double All U.S. Newspapers COMBINED

That’s the most stunning statement in a Brookings Essay “The Bad News about the News” by Robert G. Kaiser, who worked for a half-century as a writer and editor at The Washington Post. He outlines the fundamental problem of the challenge digital presents to “legacy” media:

Overall the economic devastation would be difficult to exaggerate. One statistic conveys its dimensions: the advertising revenue of all America’s newspapers fell from $63.5 billion in 2000 to about $23 billion in 2013, and is still falling. Traditional news organizations’ financial well-being depended on the willingness of advertisers to pay to reach the mass audiences they attracted. Advertisers were happy to pay because no other advertising medium was as effective. But in the digital era, which has made it relatively simple to target advertising in very specific ways, a big metropolitan or national newspaper has much less appeal. Internet companies like Google and Facebook are able to sort audiences by the most specific criteria, and thus to offer advertisers the possibility of spending their money only on ads they know will reach only people interested in what they are selling. So Google, the master of targeted advertising, can provide a retailer selling sheets and towels an audience existing exclusively of people who have gone online in the last month to shop for sheets and towels. This explains why even as newspaper revenues have plummeted, the ad revenue of Google has leapt upward year after year—from $70 million in 2001 to an astonishing $50.6billion in 2013. That is more than two times the combined advertising revenue of every newspaper in America last year. (Emphasis added.)

Some other interesting nuggets:

  • “Twenty years ago classifieds provided more than a third of the revenue of The Washington Post. Craigslist has destroyed that business for the Post and every major paper in the country.”
  • “Newspapers employed 59,000 journalists in 1989, and 36,000 in 2012 (and fewer since then).”

Kaiser’s essay does a good job of outlining the challenges faced by the big media, which is probably its most significant contribution. It’s short on solutions, but then again, that’s the real issue for the established media: if answers were apparent, the financial situation for newspapers would not have deteriorated to the extent he describes.

It’s not exactly cheery reading, but it’s at least a little less depressing than the latest news about Ebola and ISIS. Read the whole essay.

It’s also interesting for me to read this, because much of my early blogging was about trends in media, given my background in media relations. Here are a few related posts over the years:

Or you can browse through all of the related posts here.

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Bringing the Social Media Revolution to The Last Frontier

I’m excited to be at the Alyeska Resort in Girdwood Alaska today to speak to the Alaska State Hospital and Nursing Home Association.

The trip here helped me understand just how big Alaska is, and how far it is from the lower 48. One little-known fact (at least I didn’t know it): The flight from Seattle to Anchorage is the same length (about 3 hours and 15 minutes) as the flight from Minneapolis to Seattle.

Once I got to Anchorage, it was a relatively short, but amazingly scenic, trip down AK-1 to the Alyeska Hotel. The highway has lots of places to pull over for photos, and while a photo can’t really show the full beauty, here’s a taste (click to enlarge):

AK-1 Big

One extra positive of coming to present in Alaska is that it’s highly unlikely that many of the participants have heard me speak previously. That lets me do a best-of-the-best presentation. My slides are embedded below:

I look forward to the discussion today, and welcome your comments and questions.

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